Personally I think it is okay that narratives like Star Wars and Lord of the Rings have a happy ending when a single Bad Guy is defeated because stories are metaphors and not meant to reflect reality

Blowing up the Death Star is enough to win because of what the Death Star represents, not what it actually is

Sure you can write your deep military sci-fi series and get into geopolitics and all that and talk about the longterm effects of regressive governance on a society and that's all well and good but that story is doing something fundamentally different than a lot of spec-fic, ESPECIALLY in the fantasy realm, and it's just not fair to compare the way the two handle their conflicts

Follow

Fantasy stories are usually concerned with exploring some other concept and just using stopping an evil empire or whatever as a backdrop and excuse to put the heroes in motion so they can engage in the metaphorical warfare with whatever their actual problems are.

The Empire exists in Star Wars so Luke can struggle with the concept of Balance and learn to be self-reliant as he comes of age by fighting against it.

Sauron exists so Middle-Earth can struggle with the rise of technology vs pastoral life.

Shit even military sci-fi like The Forever War just kinda lets the war end eventually because the story isn't about the war itself

@witchfynder_finder I think this also has to interact a bit with the backdrop of WWI/WWII - obviously a lot of the thought behind LOTR was pre-WWII and the author said it was a lot more about tech vs pastoral life (though WWI really colors that conflict!!!), but you really can't help but think the second war throws a lot of shade on the final portrayal. And Star Wars is deliberately about space Nazis.

Sign in to participate in the conversation
Cybrespace

Cybrespace is an instance of Mastodon, a social network based on open web protocols and free, open-source software. It is decentralized like e-mail.