Show more

Okay! Chapter 1 of railstutorial.org done, time for lunch.

Ruby is a cool language, and Rails seems like a cool framework :)

the worst part of transitioning as an engineer is that I now have two groups of people telling me that i'm worthless after 30

@tindall it's not even about the money for some. MSFT only charges 20$ for Windows if you obey, and 400$ if you don't. The money is basically just part of the control game.

But if we can't have confidence in the semantics of our hardware, how on earth can we expect to build software that does what we want - let alone what our _customers_ want?

Show thread

I seriously doubt more than one or two people in the world have a good idea of the complete semantics of vector operations on X86_64, for instance. I certainly don't.

Show thread

Of course there's nothing wrong with specialization. CPU design is hard, and people train their whole lives to understand and optimize that process. But, at the same time, why on earth do our CPUs have thousand-page manuals?

Show thread

Why can't we, with a _little_ extra hardware, have a working web browser on a ZX-80?

Well, the answer is we can, but the web is such a disaster that without far more RAM than the CPU supports, it's not useful.

Show thread

As @craigmaloney so astutely pointed out yesterday, there's a reason that my banner image is of my ZX-80.

That's a computer that, while produced by a (very) profit-driven company, was simple enough that one person could truly understand the whole thing.

Show thread

@ben @tindall And trying to search the web for information on a Windows problem results in seven pages of scam websites trying to get you to install their "cleaner" exe.

@tindall In fact, profound complexity creates a huge moat around software which intends to be open to open source participation. Firefox OS suffered from this, as does Firefox itself, along with projects like ubports. Most enthusiasts--even those with a lot of SW experience--are hard pressed to climb the mountains of complexity (usually barely documented) to understand enough about the system to contribute meaningful changes.

Unbounded complexity might be the defining challenge in SW.

Even just the energy savings of such a setup justifies almost any amount of effort to get there.

Show thread

Imagine a world where a large number of devices run on RISCV variants, running microkernels which implement lightweight hypertext protocols and bespoke protocols based on lightweight frameworks that can be customized to be fit for use.

Show thread

HTTP/2 was, of course, an attempt to do this, and succeeds in some ways, but it was fundamentally created for the purpose of making things easier for existing browser vendors.

Show thread

HTTP is extremely complex. Most of that complexity is not used most of the time. That which is could be better defined and encapsulated.

Show thread

We need to have the courage to imagine what it looks like to invest in new technology stacks.

lyrics, 

Settings -> Delete Account (first class in the sidebar) -> Delete Account button -> "Are you sure?" -> Done.

Show thread

Codecademy sucks in a lot of ways but I really have to give them points for making it trivial to delete my account

@doliu666 Lmao. No, I think not. First of all, Qoto federates with Gab, so you'll need to find another instance, but also - interested in "technology (particularly windows and microsoft)"?

Show more
Cybrespace

Cybrespace is an instance of Mastodon, a social network based on open web protocols and free, open-source software. It is decentralized like e-mail.