Follow

who called it `git blame` and not `git whose-line-is-it-anyway`?

so there used to be a git-annotate, but this was merged.

@ticky CVS called it "annotate". SVN called it "annotate" and introduced 2 aliases: "blame" and "praise". Later on CVS grew a "blame" alias as well (in version 1.12).

Mercurial uses "annotate" with alias "blame" like CVS.

Git calls it "blame" with "annotate" as an alias which exists "for backwards compat" :flan_shrug: I wish git had called it just "praise".

git-scm.com/docs/git-annotate

@stsp mate it’s a joke, you don’t need to explain the history of the thing, it is a joke

@ticky Apologies, I didn't mean to barge in.

I honestly saw a question where there was none :flan_pats:

@ticky

somebody for whom typing command names longer than

ls
cd
mv
rm

is an imposition?

@deejoe did you consider that in your decision to post a reply to it?

@deejoe we were using 110/300bps modems. A fifteen character command took a half second to TRANSMIT. And the core (yes core) memory was measured in kilobytes. Short names mattered.

@ticky because 'git blame someone else' sounds better than 'git whose line is it anyway someone else'

@ticky new contender for my favourite best possible git command name, beating out my old custom script of "git onwithit"

git-onwithit, for the curious, is used to add all changed files and continue with the current rebase/merge/revert/whatever
github.com/chao-master/bin/blo

Sign in to participate in the conversation
Cybrespace

cybrespace: the social hub of the information superhighway

jack in to the mastodon fediverse today and surf the dataflow through our cybrepunk, slightly glitchy web portal