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Wired, 1993: Rebels with a Cause - Your Privacy. "On the cover were Eric Hughes, Tim May, John Gilmore, holding up an American flag, faces hidden behind white mask, their PGP fingerprints written on the foreheads. Gilmore even sporting an newly-founded EFF T-shirt. (from Thomas Rid, CS Monitor)"

Wired, 2019: YOU'RE IN PRIVATE MODE. To continue using a private window, sign in or subscribe. The title of the article being denied reads "It's Time to Switch to a Privacy Browser. Ad trackers are out of control".

@niconiconi @epicmorphism Damn, I'd almost forgotten that Wired used to be good (and I used to read it back then!)

@tfb @epicmorphism Last time I opened Wired, I saw an story that says, "new evolution of DDoS, known as Memcache", it's almost a "The Hacker known as 4 Chan" joke.

The original Wired was marvelous, an notable mag. You could see Bruce Sterling's reports, W. Gibson's commentary, and N. Stephenson's 300,000-words story of submarine cables. It was the Wired that inspirited the DotCom bubble, for good or ill.

Nowadays, it's a waste of time, only very occasionally publishes well-researched articles.

@niconiconi @epicmorphism That's the Wired I almost forgot. I stopped reading when they got too breathless over the dot-coms, so I guess 1996-7?

@tfb @niconiconi @epicmorphism I remember Wired being like 300 pages per issue every month due to all the ads. Then the Y2K bubble popped and then they scaled back to around 84-100 pages.

@niconiconi Even the paper version of today is so bad? Or is it acceptable?

@niconiconi In the 90's I used to work upstairs from Wired's San Francisco office. Around the time of the (first) .com bust, a friend gave me a "Tired/Wired" parody shirt that read "Tired/Wired/Fired". In the halls, I could always tell who worked at Wired because they'd scowl at me.

Basically what I'm saying is that I cannot believe Wired is still being published 2 decades later. That's a hell of a long time to slide on its early pedigree.

I've subsequently worked with some of Wired's founders, who were all interesting and off doing new things. What's left behind, especially after Condé Nast, I can't begin to imagine.

@readsteven @niconiconi Wait. Did we never talk about this? I worked on 3rd & Bryant on the floor BELOW the Wired office in the late 90s.

DID WE NEVER TALK ABOUT THIS?

@tsturm @readsteven Thanks for sharing the story. I always wonder how did Wired even manage to survive DotCom crash... I once asked on Hacker News but without an answer. But it's certain that it's a completely different magazine afterwards.

@niconiconi @tsturm I really don't know. I've never talked to anyone who worked there past the founding years.

I suspect it has something to do with Condé Nast buying them around '98. Wired was getting a line to "legitimate" East-coast publishing world of Vogue and GQ, and Condé Nast was buying its way into tech culture which it had no gateway into. (And I think that's why they've held onto it. It's their Rolling Stone, of a sort.)

@readsteven @niconiconi Yep, this is definitely how they survived. Condé Nast had deep coffers at that time.

@tsturm @niconiconi NO WE HAVE NEVER TALKED ABOUT THIS!!!

I did a lot of contract work for Organic Online circa '96-'99 at the 3rd and Bryant offices. (IIRC they had the top floor.)

(Also: ??!??!?!???!!!!!! Seriously?)

@readsteven @niconiconi YES!!!

I was down in the vivid studios office late '98 and all through '99. We literally must have run into each other in that building multiple times. The building entrance was pretty small and crowded, we for sure must have bumped elbows.

How weird is that???

@tsturm @niconiconi We almost certainly did! (You weren't the one who left the "Business Plan: Top Secret" on a bench in South Park were you?)

I also did a little work for Vivid, but it wasn't in that building, so I'm not sure when that would have been.

We clearly have some reminiscing to catch up on...

@niconiconi easy fix. Block javascript. Then the popup code won't be run.

@niconiconi @tmy Getting a chuckle out of Jaron Lanier already "moving on" in 1993
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