It sucks that Audacity is adding telemetry. But on the other hand, I'm fine with version 2.3. I can just keep using this one 🤷‍♀️

foss 

I really don't understand the part of foss mindset that insists that every program must be constantly changing for it to be any good. To me, it's a very capitalist ontology. What's wrong with making a good program that works, and calling it done? If it never connects to the internet, which an audio editing program doesn't need to, then you never have to worry about security vulnerabilities. Do updates to fix any major bugs that are discovered, but otherwise it's okay to just let it exist

One advantage of stable software is that it tends not to attract the interest of corporations who want to piggyback off the success of a popular program by shoehorning in changes they can monetize. By demanding constant iteration, software users are *creating* incentives for corporatization. Free software zealots want software to resemble corporate software in every aspect but the legalese, and they're surprised when this happens. If you don't like it, stop cosplaying as a business, dorks!

foss 

Computers are a tool for helping people do things. They are not an end unto themselves.

foss 

@matt Uh, wasn't Audacity bought recently?

Also like, most of the free software I use barely changes (which actually kinda sucks because there are lots of improvements to be made), so, "free software zealots change software too much" is, uh. Not very accurate.
Even pretty "experimental" stuff that also has a GUI, like qTox, Gajim, Dino, etc, they barely change, even though they easily could.

I mean, the problem you describe exists, but whether someone makes such changes doesn't seem to be a factor of how zealous they are about free software. Heck, core GNU programs haven't changed much in recent memory, and you can't get more "free software zealot" than them.

foss 

@grainloom You're right, "free software zealot" is far too broad a category for who I'm talking about, sorry. This is a more recent phenomenon and I'm not sure what to call them. The Hacker News Contingent, I guess. I need to stop paying attention to them

foss 

@matt RE the security vulnerabilities: Everything is online now whether or not the program uses the internet directly. Humans like to share our work and that’s an opening for malware to piggy back on. Think of the old Word document viruses that spread between computers via floppies. Or any buffer overrun attack in file loading code.

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