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yo, i'm mostly on @csepp nowadays, because this timeline is getting overwhelming and i want a clean start.

probably follow me there if you want to. i don't post much original stuff here now.

i might not follow you back from that account though, at least not until i put together a client that makes larger follow lists more manageable to sift through.

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groundbreaking research unearths new evidence to support the revolutionary claim that "essentially, you don't need to be an asshole to be funny"

now the researchers are investigating whether the conjecture "and being an asshole doesn't improve your jokes either" is true, but they predict it is, and point to the heaps of empirical data that already supports the claim

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follow my very cool partner in crime:
@letyepetyelepetye
ve does art and needs the pressure of having followers to improve even more 😛

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quick psa about my emoji usage
💙 : friendly, not romantic
❤ : probably romantic
so, if I toot a blue heart at you, it's not intended as romantic affection. I thought I should clarify that, since some people might feel uncomfortable with hearts being thrown at them.

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Gonna say this one time.

I don’t post this stuff because I am looking for someone to tell me there’s not a scholarly article, or a deeper dive. I post it because of trends I have seen in the reporting of day to day events, and emerging threats.

I didn’t get here on scholarly articles on emerging threats

As this one gets closer to being truly weaponized… You need to know that SPECTRE and Meltdown cannot be patched..

threatpost.com/attacks-slaught

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Ol Pejeta is pleading for help.

Whilst it may be feeling like the pandemic is ending in some parts of the world, unfortunately here in Kenya, the tourism industry has been hit so hard, we feel we are a long away from bouncing back.

Safeguarding Ol Pejeta's Rhino Populations - GlobalGiving globalgiving.org/projects/olpe

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@voltur The short of it is that the “I just want to code” developer mindset is ripe for exploitation by businesses who are incentivized by shareholder and venture capital obligations to predate on and abuse the general public through the production of technology in the form of apps and websites.

Software and other knowledge workers have an obligation to become aware of the political, social, and ethical dimensions of their work and to think about the systems of power they reinforce.

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"We have altered the Privacy Policy. Pray we do not alter it further."

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[boosts appreciated]

Hello Fediverse!

I am currently preparing material for my potential bachelor thesis in communication design. I'm looking for info on open source usage or workflow in the design industry (but basically everything none-Adobe). I know of David Revoy's book project and would love to hear about more experiences. If you have any yourself or any material at hand (blogs, videos, papers, etc.) I'd be happy if you could send it my way. 😊 ❤️

#OpenSource #adobe #FollowerPower

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Tagged Megapixels 1.0, featuring GPU debayer and GTK4 thanks to benjamin :D

Ayy, streaming some more low poly very soon. This time i'm doing some flowers.
merveilles.town/@csepp/1061676

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USSR idealization rant, long 

Oh, and I forgot to say that all these arguments have nothing to do with socialism.
Germany has free education.
Germany has (almost) universal healthcare which is by any measure much better than whatever USSR had.
Nurnberg is surrounded by forests and its urban parks are much better than whatever there was in Moscow ten years ago, and whatever is now in other large cities in Russia.

But I don't see people saying "look how Germany is great, let's further improve that!"
Instead I see "look how USSR was great and now Russia is bad, that's because socialism rocks and capitalism sucks, and there is capitalism in Germany and therefore Germany sucks!" (Despite the poorest 10% in Germany having quality of life higher than the average resident of USSR)

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USSR idealization rant, long (groceries, equality) 

I keep seeing these posts on my TL.
"Look, we asked people on Russian streets what do they think about capitalism (after USSR->Russia transition), and here is what they said, and that proves that socialism is awesome!"

"Here, a Russian person said that in USSR they always had a nice fresh food (and also that everybody were equal), and now the food in grocery stores is of much lower quality".

Everybody has some sort of nostalgia for their childhood. What people eat in childhood is often remembered as the best stuff ever, even if it was a complete shit.

But also there are some fun things regarding "everybody were equal".

There was an entire chain of stores only available to party elites and foreign tourists. An ordinary person could not even get inside.

Party elites and party members regularly received special bags of groceries (frequency and amount and quality of the goods depending on how high-ranking they were), with stuff usually not available in ordinary stores, so ordinary persons could never even buy something that party elites received for free.

And Moscow, among with a few special cities, and a closed cities, had a highest distribution priority in USSR, meaning that store shelves in Moscow were stocked even if there was only enough stock for Moscow, at the expense of everywhere else.

So there was a clear hierarchy in access to groceries:
Someone who is allowed to own foreign currency (party elites, diplomats, etc) > someone who is not (everybody else).
Party elite > high-ranking party member > less-ranking party member > ordinary party member > ordinary person.
Moscow and special cities > other capitals > everybody else.

And people who say that they always had decent fresh food and never had to queue for hours to buy a toothpaste? Most often, once you start to ask questions, turns out they lived in Moscow, and their parents were party elites. It's like listening to Walton family's (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walton_f) opinion about their quality of life under capitalism.

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socialism, USSR, long (from drafts) 

It seems that some people tend to idealize USSR based on some memes (e.g. that "anti homelessness architecture" meme where under capitalism you have spikes on all flat surfaces and under socialism you have that beautiful modern social housing).

Well, I was born in USSR, I spent most of my life in ex-USSR, I heard enough stories from my family and from the families of my peers, I saw how we lived and how these peers lived, I can tell something about post-war and post-Stalin USSR.

So, homelessness.
USSR fought homelessness e.g. by making homelessness a felony, punishable by five years of labor camps. USSR fought perceived homelessness on 1980 Olympic Games by forcibly deporting all the homeless people from Moscow and dumping them on the streets of smaller towns.
USSR did not build any housing for homeless people, contrary to what these pictures would make you to believe. And the first shelter for homeless people in USSR was created by a NGO in 1990, when it became legal to set up NGOs. (The very same NGO in 1991 successfully lobbied for democratic Russia to remove that soviet-era provision and decriminalise homelessness.)

Housing.
By 1990, the average floor area per USSR urban resident was less than half of what it was in Germany (BRD).
By that time, 10-20% of USSR urban residents still lived in so-called "communal apartments" (meaning one large flat with a single shared kitchen and a single shared bathroom, with every room, typically 15-25qm, occupied by a family with children; so e.g. 20 people from 5 families all living in a single 120qm apartment).
By that time, a noticeable share of people (including my wife's family) still lived in dormitories. Meaning you have a floor full of the similar 15-20qm rooms each occupied by a family (family of four in her case), with a communal kitchen, communal shower and communal toilet on the floor.
By that time, it was not unusual that three generations would live in a single 40qm flat with a single bedroom: the grandparents in their 50s, their children in their 20s with their spouses, and _their_ toddlers.

Ecology.
Guess it is enough to say that USSR single-handedly destroyed the entire sea ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aral_Sea ), and it was not an isolated incident. Oh, and USSR also became the world's largest oil producer by 70s, and one of the largest oil exporters.

Food.
USSR fucked up its agriculture so much that its productivity of land was at times a whole order of magnitude lower than the productivity of similar land of its capitalistic neighbors.
As a result, USSR was the world's largest grain importer, spending most of the revenue it got from selling oil to capitalistic countries on purchasing grain from the same capitalistic countries, just so that there would be no _famine_. (One could only wonder what would happen if there were no capitalistic countries to purchase grain from?)
Or fresh fruits. Apples were mostly available (although not everywhere and not always). Oranges, lemons, mandarines - quite rarely (depending on the city). Bananas - extremely rarely, a couple of times per year (not every year), and you had to stand a huge queue for them.
Or any fresh produce. It was of extremely low quality. Even the basic potatoes were usually almost rotten.

Non-food goods.
Toilet paper was in a huge deficit for the most of the time since its appearance (it was in 70s AFAIK), there were huge (literally, like kilometer-long) queues every time it happened to be in stock in some store. People had to use newspaper clippings instead.
But sanitary pads, tampons, or diapers were just unheard of (unless you belonged to a party elite). Women had to literally use rags for their and their children's hygienic needs. Economy planners just didn't think ordinary women would need anything like that. Especially considering that economy planners were elite themselves, and had special access to all the imported goods.

Indigenous people.
The whole indigenous populations were interred during Stalin's reign, their land plots and homes confiscated: e.g. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deportat
It was only during perestroika, right before USSR fall, that USSR finally admitted it might have made a bad decision back then, and allowed Crimean Tatars to return to Crimea. Of course they did not get their land or their homes back, and there were no reparations.

Oh, and Stalin's USSR, in addition to being built on prison labor, has also literally murdered a bunch of people from my extended family, just for their faith or ethnicity. During perestroika KGB admitted it was a mistake; there were no apologies though.

I'm not saying what we have now is not awful (it is). But USSR was just as awful.
All these problems are not inherent to the current system, they were just as present under the regime which called itself socialistic, and which a lot of people seem to take as an almost-perfect social order.

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build on the commons
give back to the commons
tend to the commons

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"Who Will Mourn the Tech Bro?
The subculture you love to hate is tough to define. It will be even tougher when it’s gone."

"I asked Ingram to define “tech bro” for me. She offered: men working in tech who have 'a disregard for other people because they believe that everyone in the world is treated equally.'

This made more sense than anything I’d heard. It’s a definition that addresses the industry’s theoretical status as equalizer, its proponents’ view of themselves as forces for democratization. They write the code that permits tiny businesses to process credit cards, or allows almost anyone, regardless of background or monetary worth, to maintain their own website. The god in the machine as deliverer of equality through binary code. The ones and zeros see us as all the same."

seattlemet.com/news-and-city-l

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Nvidia when it makes a CPU and only makes the firmware for it work with kernel 3.8
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So... the Dutch city of Utrecht has an underwater webcam at a particular lock that is not used by ships much in spring. People can watch for fishes waiting to get inland, and can ring a "doorbell" to alert the lock keeper so they might open the lock if there are enough fish waiting...
visdeurbel.nl/about-the-fishdo

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